By
No comments

Shoulder pain, and more specifically, shoulder tendinitis is a common overuse injury in sports (such as swimming, baseball and even BJJ) where the arm is used in an overhead motion. The pain – usually felt at the tip of the shoulder and referred or radiated down the arm – occurs when the arm is lifted overhead or twisted. In extreme cases, pain will be present all of the time and it may even wake you from a deep sleep.

The shoulder is a closely fitted joint.  The humerus (upper arm bone), the tendons of the rotator cuff that connect to the muscles that lift the arm, and associated bursa (friction reducing membranes), move back and forth through a very tight archway of bone and ligament called the coracoacromial arch. When the arm is raised, the archway becomes smaller and compresses the tendons and bursa. Repetitive use of the arm makes the tendons and bursa prone to injury and inflammation.

Bursitis occurs when the bursa becomes inflamed and painful due to compression inside of the coracoacromial arch. Tendinitis occurs when a rotator cuff tendon becomes inflamed, swollen and tender. Symptoms of tendinitis and bursitis usually last for only a few days, but may recur or become chronic.

The goal of your rehabilitation program should be impairment based, focusing on pain reduction, increasing range of motion, strength, restoring function and then maximizing 
function needed during ADL’s, work or sports.

 

Military Shrug
  1. Standing with your feet shoulder-width apart and knees slightly bent, use a light to medium-strength band for this movement.
  2. Begin by pulling the bands towards you, in a rowing motion until your arms are bent at a 90 degrees and your forearms are parallel to the band. Retract, or squeeze your shoulder blades together.
  3. Slowly begin to externally rotate your arms outward, while keeping the inside of your upper arms tight against your lats, or outer-back.
  4. Now, maintaining your arm and shoulder blade position, extend your head upwards, looking roughly where the wall and ceiling meet.
  5. Return to the starting position and repeat.
External Rotation To Press
  1. Standing with your feet shoulder-width apart and knees slightly bent, use a light 
to medium-strength band for this movement.
  2. Holding a band in one hand, with your elbow bent at 90 degrees, keep your upper arm also at 90 degrees to your body.
  3. Rotate your forearm up and back to 90 degrees, maintaining your upper arm position throughout the movement.
  4. From here “press” your arm upwards maintaining a vertical position the entire time. Bring your arm back down to the starting position.
  5. Complete all reps on one side before switching to the other side.
Banded Wall Abductions
  1. Standing with your feet shoulder-width apart and knees slightly bent, use a light 
to medium-strength band for this movement.
  2. Loop or tie a band around both wrists or forearms, with your elbows bent at 90 degrees and your forearms hands pressed up against a wall.
  3. One at a time, move each arm outward just a few inches maintaining your upper arm position throughout the movement.
  4. Alternate back and forth from arm to the other, completing all reps and repeat.
Standing Band Rows
  1. Standing with your feet shoulder-width apart and knees slightly bent, use a light 
to medium-strength band for this movement.
  2. Holding each handle separately and arms fully extended, begin by squeezing your shoulder blades together and pushing your chest forward.
  3. Next pull the handles towards your stomach, pause, and return to the starting position.